Get your team out for 30 Days Wild

Wednesday 13th June 2018

The marketing team at Warton Crag by Alan WrightThe marketing team at Warton Crag by Alan Wright

The 30 Days Wild Challenge is not all about doing things as individuals, you can get your friends and work colleagues to join in too.

Schools, businesses,sports and social clubs are all participating in our challenge to get everyone to do something wild every day in June.

So far some 68,000 have signed up for the challenge across the UK and that includes a bumper 3,500 in our region - nearly 500 more than 2017.

So, The Marketing team from The Wildlife Trust for Lancashire, Manchester and North Merseyside decided we would take up the challenge for one day - and we all set off for a trip to Warton Crag and the RSPB's Leighton Moss Nature Reserve.

It was great for the full team to see one of our most dramatic reserves, climbing 163 metres or 535 foot above the wonderful Morecambe Bay.

And we were shown the work that our officers and volunteers have done in creating rides for butterflies, meaning they have unhindred paths for feeding and breeding on the lush plants and rocky outcrops.

The reserve is of national importance for its butterflies, with pearl bordered fritillary, small pearl bordered fritillary and high brown fritillary. Other notable butterflies, described by reserve manger Reuben Neville, include Northern brown argus, wall brown and dingy skipper, and I managed to get some lovely pics of a wall brown.

It was quite difficult to identify because some of its wings were missing. Could this mean the wall brown had been involved in a great adventure, possible being grabbed by some predtory bird? We will never know.

We spent some time posing for our videographer friend Nick Rodd, for a future Wildlife Trust film.

After lunch among the bracken, it was time for lunch

a black tailed skimmer. I've never seen one of them before

and then off to see the wonders of Leighton Moss.

We were made most welcome by our conservation colleagues from the RSPB, including former head ranger David Mower, the oracle of the reserve.

Over the next few hours we saw a marsh harrier, a pied wagtail teaching its fledgling to fly, a great white egret and lots of dragonflies and damselflies including a black tailed skimmer. I've never seen one of them before.

We overstayed our welcome because it was such a lovely day but as a team bonding execise it was just about perfect. This is the team that tells you all about the work of the Wildife Trust and speaks to members on a daily basis. And what a passionate bunch we all are.

                                                                                             Alan Wright