Eco church diaries: May 2021

This month, St Michael's eco church is embracing Plantlife's 'No Mow May' campaign and all the benefits it brings to wildlife.

We’re embracing the wild side of the churchyard this month and ‘No Mow May’ helps us to appreciate the wildflowers among us by allowing nature to run free. Bluebells and forget-me-nots contrast beautifully with the long grass; they shine brightly but briefly, as they do every year.

The cherry tree blossom is also a welcome sight in the springtime, despite the recent bank holiday weather making staying indoors more tempting. Above ground, birds on the wing include bullfinches feeding their chicks. Their strong bills make these little birds experts at cracking nuts and seeds, something we gave thought to when replenishing our bird feeders this week (not an easy task in the strong winds!).

Bluebells growing in the churchyard of St Michael's Eco Church in Bolton

Bluebells at St Michael's Eco Church in Bolton

One of the adjacent low-lying buildings, St Michael’s C of E Primary School, is also part of the same wildlife corridor. The attractive grounds incorporate a wildlife area and secure pond surrounded by marsh marigolds, kingcups, cowslips and even wild garlic.

A wildlife pond in the grounds of St Michael's C of E Primary School

St Michael's C of E Primary School pond

In here you will find tadpoles swarming like little dots in the shallow water, oblivious to the heavy spring raindrops. The children have also helped to put up bird boxes in the school wood, in which great tits and nuthatches have taken up residence.

We look forward to you joining us again for another installment of our Eco Church Diaries, when we hope to observe the next stage in the frog life cycle!